Distinguished environmental law expert joins UWS


Date: 26/10/2009

The University of Western Sydney has appointed world-renowned environmental law activist, Mahesh Chander Mehta, to the School of Law as an honorary Adjunct Fellow.

Mr Mehta will take up a position within the College of Business where he will also become an Associate Member of the University's Social and Environmental Responsibility (SER) Research Group.

Professor Michael Jeffery QC, from the UWS School of Law, and newly appointed head of SER, is honoured to have the prestigious environmental law campaigner join the University in this capacity.

"Mr Mehta is recognised as one of the world's foremost environmental law activists, and is the recipient of numerous prestigious international awards including the UN Goldman Prize and the Magsaysay Award for Asia," says Professor Jeffery.

"Mr. Mehta has spent a lifetime defending the Indian environment and people. He has filed dozens of major cases, on environment and human rights, before the Court-with an extraordinary success rate."

"It is a great privilege to have the opportunity to work alongside such a notable environmental lawyer and enrich the University's strong research culture."

Mr Mehta will work closely with Professor Jeffery and Professor Donna Craig, who are environmental lawyers from the UWS School of Law, as well as with colleagues at Wuhan University, China and Tribhuvan University, Nepal.

Together the group will collaborate on a research project to address the impacts of melting glaciers from climate change in the Himalayas and Northern China on major river systems in India, China and Nepal.

The project will include comparative research on the reduced flows in Australia's major river basins from over allocation of water entitlements and prolonged drought to adequately address the impacts of melting glaciers as a result of climate change.

M.C. Mehta also recently released a new book entitled 'In the Public Interest', which chronicles his landmark environmental law endeavours, ranging from saving some of India's greatest treasures, including the Taj Mahal and the Ganges River, to introducing much needed reform by increasing enforcement of child labour laws and the institution of nationwide environmental education.

Ends

Contact:


Media Officer


Kristy Gleeson
k.gleeson@uws.edu.au
02 9678 7085, 0414 018 498